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the state -- and do it without raising taxes. [applause] stand with me and the over 2,500 construction workers we want to put to work building world class schools for our world class workforce. and while we are at it, let's make sure that those 2,500-plus construction workers newly employed by the j.o.b.s. bill are our friends and neighbors. right now, we have a law on the books that is supposed to require that at least half of the workers on any construction project funded by state or local tax dollars be montana residents, but it's riddled with loopholes and not enforceable. when taxpayer money is funding a project, let's put montana companies and montana workers first. let's work together to close these loopholes and expand this requirement to all projects -- [applause] work together to close these loopholes and expand this requirement to all projects -- not just construction. and let's also significantly increase the proportion of montana workers required on any state or locally funded project. i hope you will join rep. amanda curtis and me to pass this measure so we can put more m
in the social security payroll tax, the increase in tax rates on income above certain thresholds and the cuts in federal spending scheduled to take effect next month will mean reduced spending by both consumers and the government. we project inflation adjusted g.d.p. will increase about 1.5% in 2013. but it will increase roughly 1.5% fast if not for the fiscal tightening. after the economy adjusts to that fiscal restraint, we expect the growth in real g.d.p. will pick up to about 3.5% per year in 2014 and the following few years. but the gap between the nation's g.d.p. and what it is capable of producing on a sustainable basis, what we call potential g.d.p., will not close quickly at that rate of growth. under current law, we expect output to remain below its potential level until 2017. almost a decade after the recession started in december of 2007. by our estimates, g.d.p. was more than 5% below its potential level in the fourth quarter of last year. a gap that is only modestly smaller than the gap that existed three years ago. because growth in output since then has been only slightly fast
. in two years we have announced new jobs in 45 of south carolina's 46 counties. we have cut taxes on small businesses. we have passed reforms that put the cap on lawsuit damages. we fought against the unions rejected unionization of south carolina -- we fought against the unionization of south carolina. the department of social services moved more than 14,000 families from welfare to work. we created a business partnership to showcase the largest industry in our state. we have been rewarded for the second consecutive year a gold shovel in recognition of our economic development success. we have been ranked the second best nation in -- the second best state in the nation to do business. [applause] we have announced $5 billion in foreign investment and we have seen no less authority than the wall street journal say that anyone who thinks the u.s. has lost its manufacturing topps has not been to south carolina. "it" stateoming the :it when it comes to economic -- i would like to ask you to help me welcome these wonderful friends of south carolina. please stand and remain standing when i call
that cuts defense spending once again. it has $500 billion in new taxes and also cuts in domestic spending. it is irresponsible, unacceptable. it leaves their troops and our economy and ready to face the challenges of the future. or the threats of today. when i went to the steering committee to apply for this job, i explained to them the way i saw the jobless to make sure that our troops, those who we sent into harm's way would have everything they needed to carry out their missions and return home safely. everything in the way resources, training, leadership, these things are very important. and i look at what is happening with these cuts that we have seen the last couple of years and it is just irresponsible that the commander in chief, his main job should be the same that i look at as my job, only he should be looking out for the soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines that he sent into harm's way. he should not send them with anything less than the told that -- the total they need. and to be stepping up and continuing to cut -- i visited with their top leaders, and they have told me that
excess spending in our tax code so that the wealthiest cannot take advantage of loopholes and reductions that are not available to most americans. 2012 can be a year of solid growth and more jobs and higher wages. -- 2013 can be a year of solid growth and more jobs and higher wages. everyone in washington needs to focus on what is right for the country, on what is right for you and your families. that is how we will get our economy moving faster. it will strengthen our middle class. we will build a country that rewards the effort and determination of every single american. thank you. have a great weekend. >> hello. my name is susan brooks. it is a pleasure to speak to you from my home state on indiana. my husband and i have raised two children here. i've been a us attorney for this area and starting last month, one of the state voices and that u.s. house. i'm proud to live in a state that spends less than it takes in. the secret to our success has always been a value system that promotes a strong sense of responsibility and accountability. family members and tax payers and community volu
located in canada and skype in their input. i pay the taxes in canada and not in the u.s. >> in silicon valley, that is commonly happening. everywhere else but silicon valley. we want people here so they will pay taxes here and interact and start more companies after they finish projects. >> thank you. >> the gentleman from new york is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you. you have indicated throughout your testimony the need for policy or practical reasons to emphasize as we tackle this immigration issue of highly skilled visas. you have founded a company of 1000 plus employees. you have written a book. you work at one our most distant wish universities. you have -- one of our most distant wish to universities have contributed much to america. we have a history of dealing with refugees with a passion that makes sense for who we are and what we represent in our democratic values. with the history of making sure that we grant visas in recognition of the fact that we need to draw from people all across the world. that is the premise of the diversity. tha that makes a stronger. the ne
." -- please tax me more." we have gotten so desperate in this area that we are talking about, perhaps because we cannot make a policy decision on this and have not since the early 1990's on the federal level, maybe we need to go to indexing of the fuel tax. >> you are talking like infrastructure, not to pay for subsidies, right? >> what we need is more infrastructure, and that is a public good, and it needs to be paid for, and generally with tax revenues. i do not think anybody is faulting that. i think it is sold that we need higher fuel tax, and we can use that either to reduce the deficit or to pay for something else. it was designed -- or intended -- whether it has done so successfully or not, it was done to pay for infrastructure. >> absolutely. we are not real happy about that. >> john, what are you hoping for next week? >> for some reason, i have not been consulted on that. the president in the campaign said he was 4 and all of the above energy policy, so let's have some announcements that support that -- he was for an " all of the above" energy policy. let's move forward with the thin
. they are simply willing to spend money. they gave tax cuts and never paid for them. in the end they have eroded the revenue of the government. some of it is coming back. the wars are winding down. the economy is picking up. but there is a real health care problem that we have to deal with at some point. it will take some revenue. you cannot just do it by magically saying that it will fallout of the sky. you cannot cut enough to get the debt down without talking about revenue. i think it they did a little bit here at the end of january 3. everyone gave the office and will not give again. host: this editorial from "usa today," de say that it is not a spending problem -- but "usa spend money. today," others, saying that it is. guest: let me explain. the average cost spent on a senior citizen in medicare is flat. it went up 0.4% last year. it is flat spending. the fact is that beginning in 2011, all the children born after the second world war, the so-called baby boomers, are coming on. when i came to congress in 1989 there were 35 million seniors on medicare. 30 million people altogether. we have
an opportunity scholarship bill giving businesses a tax credit for making contributions to a scholarship fund. these dollars will be distributed, on a means-tested basis, to students at low- performing schools for use in attending the school of their choice. [applause] all in, the proposed budget includes 135 million dollars in new investment in nevada's schoolchildren. [applause] and as parents and taxpayers, we have a right to expect a return on that investment. while nevada's teachers will be supported through the most effective professional development, elevated student performance requires an outstanding teacher in every classroom, and an outstanding principal in every building. nevada is on the cusp of implementing a system that will transform the way we evaluate our state's teachers and administrators. but we need to take the next step. my budget includes an appropriation for a data system that links student performance to teacher effectiveness. this system is a long term investment in what will be the backbone of our approach to teacher evaluation. it will ensure that parents and stud
the people of south carolina proud by giving them successes on tax relief and regulatory reform and strengthening protections and cyber security. it is a great day in south carolina. it will only continue if we make it so. i look forward to the fingers going down and handshakes beginning. thank you. god bless you. me he continue to bless the great state of south carolina. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> martin o'malley called for the repeal of the death penalty, asking for tougher gun control laws increasing our jobs in maryland. this 35 minute event is part of the maryland public television. >> thank you. thank you all. got bless you. >> thank you very, very much. bannermr. speaker, mr. president, distinguished minority leaders, lieutenant brown, governor hughes, attorney general gensler, colleagues and city colleagues, mayor vincent gray from our neighbors and new columbia. [laughter] ambassadors, members of fema of these united states. [applause] katie o'malley and the men and women of the maryland general assembly, there is more that unites us tha
for veterans and a proposed tax increase on beer and alcohol. this is 35 minutes. >> order. questions to the prime minister. alison seabeck. >> thank you, mr. speaker. this morning i had meetings with mine tieral colleagues and others and in addition to my duties in the house i will have other meetings today. >> alison sea beck. >> i'm hear to speak, it right a mother in his constituency should not speak of the bedroom tax and confirm why her minister be able to offer her son, serving in the magesty's armed forces either a home or a bedroom on his return from duty? >> the reforms to housing benefit that we're putting in place, i'll very happily look at the case, as the honorable lady says. but the reforms that are put in place have a very clear principle of the heart. there are many people in private rented accommodation who do not have housing benefits and can't afford extra bedrooms and we have to get control of housing benefits. we're now spending as a country $23 billion pounds on housing benefits and we have to get that budget under control. >> rebecca harris. >> do my honorable
scheduled to begin march 1. it is including tax changes. the president spoke to reporters for just over five minutes. >> good afternoon, everybody. i wanted to say a few words about the looming deadlines and decisions that we face on our budget and on our deficit, and these are decisions that will have real and lasting impacts on the strength and pace of our recovery. economists and business leaders from across the spectrum have said that our economy is poised for progress in 2013. and we've seen signs of this progress over the last several weeks. home prices continue to climb. car sales are at a five-year high. manufacturing has been strong. and we've created more than six million jobs in the last 35 months. but we've also seen the effects that political dysfunction can have on our economic progress. the drawn-out process for resolving the fiscal cliff hurt consumer confidence. the threat of massive automatic cuts have already started to affect business decisions. so we've been reminded that while it's critical for us to cut wasteful spending, we can't just cut our way to prosperity. deep,
their families, they are contributing. there's always the question about paying taxes. they pay taxes. you can check with the social security department. there is a large amount that those unaccounted for. they do not know who toot attribute that money to pray we need to do reform so when they pay tax it goes into the right account and it helps fund and fuel our economy. and what the mayor and the state and federal government to garner this tax dollars and not for it to be in the pocket of sun -- some unscrupulous employer who is taxing the but not sending the money on. we all know that there was an increase in the earning ability of the undocumented once the became. everyone keeps talking about innovation. let me give you a little innovation. we talked about the uncertainty of the market and what we do as a congress. the uncertainty of what we do and what that causes. i want everyone to think one moment. what you think about the uncertainty in the life of a male -- 11 million undocumented workers when you give them certainty? i will tell you what i believe they're going to do. they're going t
at the washington institute. after that we have chris edwards. he is a top expert on federal and state tax and budget issues. he's testified to congress many times and his articles have appeared in "the washington post" and other newspapers. last but not least we have alex nowrasteh. he has advocated for prosperity. he was a policy analysts. his work has aweired in "the wall street journal" and he has appeared on fox news and bloomberg. i will turn the podium over to david. >> thank you and thank you to all of you for being here. it is good to have you here. my colleagues are going to talk about specific policy issues in their area of we can per tease. i'm going to open with more general, philosophical, political discussion. a lot of people believe that politics are a struggle for power and certainly if you look at history that is what politics is. it is the continuation of war by other means. it is a quest for power for your race, tribe, religion, region, whatever, your industry these days. politics is a lot about power. but we always hope that some people in the discussion of politics an
's new regulations or his tax increases and therefore it is all the more difficult for them to expand their businesses and create jobs in america. to add to the uncertainty, the president's proposed sequestration is set to take effect this march. despite his promise, his promise to the american people that it would never actually happen, the president has yet to take any steps to undo this harmful measure. he has shown absolute indifference to the millions of americans whose livelihoods will be severely impacted by his sequestration. house republicans have twice passed legislation to replace the president's sequester with commonsense reforms that will reduce spending, preserve and strengthen our safety net for generations and preserve our national defense. this week the house will pass a budget but it will be a responsible budget that will balance. one that will aim to grow the economy, drive down unemployment, expand opportunity and prosperity for the private sector and ensure that america maintains its leading role in the world as a strong national defender. americans can do this. w
in it, we don't tax you think about it. it is as if because we know it was awful, we can somehow pretended was not part of american culture. >> and early 20th century -- eugenics, in early 20th century. >> "washington journal" continues. michael're back with burgess, a republican and vice chairman of the energy and commerce subcommittee. thanks for talking to our viewers. guest: thanks for having me. host: republicans are saying to avoid the automatic spending cuts, we need entitlement reform on the table. president obama said yesterday if we cannot agree to something long-term like entitlement reform, let's do something short-term. do you agree? guest: no. president obama should be talking about the next sequester, because this one is happening. it was postponed to march 1 on the first and january. this is a promise that we made, the congress and the president made to the american people in order to get our fiscal house in order if we could not come up with the cuts, the savings to do that, these cuts would be automatic. host: you are ok with them? guest: i don't like it. the re
real spenged cuts for more tax hikes. the president's sequester should be replaced with spending cuts and reforms that put us on a path to balance a budget over the next 10 years. the american people believe that the tax question has been settled. they know the president called for a balanced approach to the debt. combination of revenues and spending cuts, and they know he's gotten his revenue. the american people do not believe the president will use further tax revenues to lower the debt. and haven't seen this president attempt to spend his way into prosperity over the last four years, they know he'll spend it. the president doesn't believe we have a spending problem. he general winly believes the government -- genuinely believes the government spending causes economic growth. if that were true, the economy today would be thriving. it isn't thriving. the unemployment rate is still nearly 8% and rising. small businesses like the one i ran are struggling. middle class families, those lucky enough to have a job, are living paycheck to paycheck. and president obama just insisted on rais
asks for, if we give him every tax increase he asks for, if we do absolutely everything that the budget he's required by law to submit requests, we will begin to pay down the first penny of debt never. in fact, if we do absolutely everything that the budget he's required by law to submit to us asks, the debt will continue to grow forever. i agree with so much my friends on other side are saying about the sequester, about the fiscal cliff. that's why we acted in may on this body, that's why we passed another sequester replacement in august, that's why we passed another one in december. i agree. but can't we also agree that if you're going to be commander in chief of america, if you're going to be the president of the united states, if you're going to uphold and defend the constitution, and we have our former joint chiefs of staff chairmen telling us that our greatest national security threat is our growing debt, shouldn't it be fair to ask the president to tell us when, if ever, he plans to begin paying back the first penny? mr. speaker, it's not a stupid piece of legislation that we're
. we take no tax dollars. we don't have the ability to reduce costs in a way a private business would. and we are at the end of our borrowing authority. to give some perspective of our liquid situation, a typical large organization would either have cash on hand or quick borrowing ability. in october, the postal service had less than four days of cash on hand. that's a very scary situation and no situation that a business should be in. and this is why we have taken aggressive steps to reduce our costs and why we have been so vocal about seeking postal reform legislation. we faced a major hurdle to return to profitability and long-term stability. we need to generate $20 billion in cost reductions and revenue increases to close the budget gap and be able to repay our debt, both close the gap and repay the debt. and this is why the board of governors has directed us to take every necessary step to reduce costs and conserve cash necessary to continue our operations. it's what we have been doing consistently over the last couple of years. and we will be accelerating those efforts moving fo
you think about the proposed tax increases the president made yesterday? caller: i think, my issue with that -- we have already had our tax increase in the first place. i don't necessarily agree with them. i realize that you need a little more revenue. i will agree with that to an extent, because it is both sides. if he is trying come to a balanced proposal at this point in time and propose equal cuts versus revenue, that's not fair, because we have already increased our taxes in the first place. the original deal was supposed to solve the fiscal cliff. host: april is on our facebook page. randy is an independent in butler, oklahoma. good morning. caller: i think they ought to let it go through. military budgets have doubled in the last 12 years and the research and development part of that is over $60 billion. that is not buying tanks or anything. we have spent $200 billion on the f-22 program, the fight for that no one wants. plenty of things to cut. go ahead and raise my taxes. i realize we have to bring in more money. i'm a grown-up. i will just take home less money, but we hav
session which topics included state of the economy, housing benefits for veterans and a proposed tax increase on beer and alcohol. this is 35 minutes. dispersed so they can go to the projects so desperately needed. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. >> thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in the cells i shall have further such meetings later today. >> thank you, mr. speaker. is it right that a mother and my contingency may not -- confirmed by his minister, her son serving in her majesty's armed forces -- [inaudible] >> the reforms to housing benefit that we're putting in place, and i'm happy to look at the case of the honorable lady says -- [shouting] >> but they have a very clear principle out of their hard. there are many people who don't have housing benefit, who cannot afford extra bedrooms, and we have to get control of housing benefits. we are now spending as the country 23 billion pounds on housing benefits and we have to get that budget under co
to a long-term unified approach to our debt and deficit. the tenants of that of course deal with the tax expenditures that we deal with that and the health care costs that are going up. the chair: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. schrader: with that i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. price: i claim time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. price: thanks, madam chair. i want to commend my colleague from oregon and colleagues that came together to submit this amendment as i believe it truly to be well-intentioned but i think it misses the mark. i think for two reasons specifically that it ought not be adopted by this body. first, it unnecessarily restricts the ability of the president to determine how he would balance the budget. remember, the underlying bill doesn't tie the president's hands in any way. it simply says to the president, when you submit your budget to congress, just let us know when it's going to balance. it's not going to balance within the period of time that's defined by the budget window,
exchange. third, utah will not administer the premium tax credit through our exchange. there's a number of reasons we decided why not to do that. one, we pride ourselves in utah in being fiscally prudent. and i wish washington had that same pride which they certainly don't have in being fiscally prudent. only seven states in america have a a.a.a. bond rating on wall street, which tells us a lot about utah and what else is going on in the country. given the fiscal uncertainty we see here in washington, d.c.,, much of it created by a growing mentality, doesn't seem to me and to the people of utah to be a fiscally prudent thing to do when we are already borrowing 40 cents on every dollar that we spend and in large part because of the growing entitlement mentality we have in the country. i think this becomes a very risky proposition as we go forward. i don't know how much it's going to end up it's going to cost and i don't know anybody knows how much it's going to cost us. i do know the original promise by the president was going to cost us $900 billion. today the c.b.o. estimates it has go
not use the word amnesty just for immigration. we do it for tax policy. people that do not pay their taxes. >> looked down the road six or eight months. what will be the big sticking point and immigration? give me the first paragraph of the story about why the two sides appear step? >> that leads to immigration. that way to citizenship. >> the simple concept of methodology? >> the methodology and determination of when the border is it here. >> what about the methodology? will it be a fight over a trigger? >> that is the basis for it. i think i have spoken to its. committees are going to make a determination that the border is secure and in the pathway to citizenship kicks in. who makes that determination that i think congress ought to make it. >> is to get on the political aspect of immigration, senator mccain said if it is not taking care of relatively soon republicans could pay a price in future elections. i want to get your sense on whether that is an impetus for you to try to support this? >> i think senator mccain is right. i think he's a little naive to think that hispanic people, we
is there that he put spending cuts on the table. he asked them for them to be paired with tax increases as well. there is more good will than people realize. more agreement that we have such a big budget problem that will we're going to fire on all cylinders. we have to cut spending. frankly, we have raise more revenue. >> you're listening to the california program and our speakers are economic experts. we are discussing national, regional, and global economic challenges. you can find video online. there's a series of questions around employment and job growth. what what is your outlook on job growth? >> i will start. i think -- i will say i was here last year and i'm more optimistic this year than last year. we made a significant amount of progress. it looks like housing prices have started to turn the corner. if you look at household balance sheets we see that consumers have paid down that debt that weighed on them. i think there are reasons to be optimistic. i am fairly optimistic. i think we still have things weighing on us. i think the concern about, are we going to shoot ourselves in the
religious institutions ought not to be tax-exempt and get all the tax breaks that they do. they are using their tax breaks to hire lawyers that are costing the taxpayers even more money to basically just have a normal secular society. this issue of birth control, the rest of the world is laughing at us that we are even controverting over it. it should not even be an issue on the table. again, the tax-exempt status for religious institutions, i do not know if there are organizations that are trying to repeal this tax-exempt status, but i never really heard of a program on c- span about it, but these organizations, these religious institutions -- it is the tax breaks they get. host: nick from fairview, tennessee. on the independent line. caller: this is a ploy. socialists like the kennedys and obama, they will vilify -- if they cannot get it right, kruschev said, we will take two steps forward, and one step backward. we no longer live under a constitutional republic. liberals claim that it is a religious group that is against them. the state has become the major religion in this country. th
for about eight months now. but it to best way to a budget -- a balanced budget would be reinstating the tax on wall street transactions. there are quadrillions of dollars in turnover and a 1% tax would generate trillions of dollars in revenue. host: talk about your retirement strategy a little bit. host: there is not -- caller: there is none. that is the point. average people are in the same kind of predicament, not knowing what -- what do they call it? they want to have stability and predictability. where is it? host: when it comes to yourself, have you put anything away? caller: ipad, but it is all gone now. i would like to see a national infrastructure project. we could put people to work. host: steve from twitter -- host: next we're going to charlie. mississippi, independent line. caller: good morning. i am from jackson, where the capital is. i retired in 2009. it is a good thing. i was a civil servant. now in the state house there is legislation where some young republicans want to phase out our state retirement program for civil servants. house bill 486 allows people to just elect, if
of a tax -- of disclosure. michael bennett, senator from colorado, happens to be a brother of our editor in chief, james bennett. you would think that would be great access, but it is a hurdle. they do not dislike each other, but they are so careful about not mingling interests of what got you here today was the talk about immigration. i thought about getting all of you together, but you have slightly different takes. you are a member of the group of eight. maybe it is not a group of 7.5, depending how senator menendez is doing. >> we will see. >> in the question of how the white house -- even today, the president said at the democratic house retreat that he is heartened by democrats and republicans both seem to take this seriously. politics may not be easy. there are regional variations in the country. there is youth and dynamism. i love you in your group of eight role. also sharing your work with the colorado compact. talk about the michael bennett vision of what we need to do to achieve immigration reform. >> if i can, let me take you to colorado on this issue. that is where my intere
of companies paid out dividends in anticipation of tax law changes. also, some companies paid out special bonuses. that did lead to an unusually strong number for december. but, you know, in general, it was a temporary kind of thing. we would not expect those things. host: how did the year look? guest: overall, we had an increase of 3.5% for the year .12. -- 2012. that is a good increase. it is a little below the long- term trends. host: when is a personal income, is that take-home pay or are there several factors associated? guest: there are a number of factors involved. within personal income, we have wages and salaries which account for more than half of the total. we also have small business income, things like rental income and also investment income in terms of interest and dividends and so forth. there is transfer income, social security and unemployment and so forth. there is a variety of types of income. it is an all-encompassing. host: a boost as far as money is concerned. what does that say overall, not only from how people personally did but how does it into the economy? guest
, or a suggestion that we need to impose a carbon tax, because that is designed to increase the costs. in my state of alaska, in a community like [indiscernible] a you come community on the river, they pay $6.90 for their diesel. that is how they heat their homes. when you suggest to them that the best thing to do is increase the price to decrease consumption, i do not know what the temperature is there this morning, but last week in the interior temperatures range between 45 degrees below zero and 50 degrees below zero. i cannot go back to alaska and tell people that the way that we tackle this is to increase your prices, demanding you to use less and limit your choices. that is not what a strong nation does. what a strong nation does is figure out how we advanced to the next stage, how we build out these clean technologies and diverse technologies that will allow us to do your choices. more and do it in a clean and environmentally responsible way. raising our energy costs, imposing the mandates, other heavy handed ideas but are out there for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, they will not pass.
organizations, which are really political action committees that can get tax and for what they are doing. jane jacobs was seem well into the future. she understood that the only chance to preserve economic innovation is to have a third force that attacks the emergence -- the merchant interests of innovation that cannot have those middlemen the merchant and tress of innovation that cannot have those middlemen -- the merchant what we now know is that the third force is you. those activists in the cause of the internet freedom and after-- in because of the digital economy include the 15 million people the united states congress heard loud and clear last january and has such enormous cloud on the political process. make no mistake about it. legislators have to do their part. there are democrats and republicans from all across the political spectrum who see the importance of innovation and who are going to stand in the way of those who would try to hot wire the system to favor the incumbent and harm innovation. they seek special help from the government, claiming they won a marketplace that does no
, yes, deficits and taxes and sequesters and potential government shutdowns, debt ceiling, we'll talk about that stuff. but we'll talk about it from the perspective on how we're making sure someone works hard in this country. a cop, teacher, a construction worker, or a reception worker, they can make it if they work hard. their kids can make it and dream bigger dreams than they have achieved. obviously, a lot of what we'll be working on over the next few weeks is going to be on how do we deal with this sequester issue. i want to make this quick point. i had a press conference this week in which i reiterated that i'm prepared, eager, and ang shouse that ends this government by crisis that every two week or every two months or every six months we are threatening this hard recovery, are finally housing is picking up and real estate is doing better and unemployment numbers are still too high. we're geing job growth and manufacturing is doing well and we continue to have these self-inflicted crisis here in washington where suddenly someone taps the brakes. what i said this week was i want
later, the president of women tribe worldwide tax about the state of women's rights. " washington journal host: good morning. we will learn more about immigration with the judiciary committee. the senate could work this week on the chuck hagel nomination. the question remains whether or not republicans will block the nomination with a filibuster. the president traveling to push for slacker gun laws. with the nation focusing on the super bowl, we want to turn to washington's role on regulating the nfl. we will use super bowl sunday to talk about government regulations when it comes to the issue of steroids or head injuries. the phone lines are open. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines courtesy of the museum. from "the san francisco chronicle" -- from "the baltimore sun" -- let's turn to the politics and policy behind the nfl. this is a story a few days ago from "the washington post." outlining a plan and a letter to the executive director of the players union. they agreed as part of a 2011 collective bargaining agreement that the players should be tested for hgh, but t
've come to the u.s. to be productive, tax-paying members of our civil society and to attain the american dream. unfortunately immigrants of the african area like so many groups around the world are dealing with backlogged immigration processes. families being ripped apart, falling out of status because they have aged out of the legal immigration process. racial and status discrimination, unfair criminal aggravated felony laws, depour tration processes that violate -- deportation processes that violate rights and insecure and prohibitive student visa programs, limited access to work permits and much, much more. you see, many immigrants arrive on our shores during a time of their lives when they are the most productive. any delay in processing these individuals, in bringing them to the floor, deny us the opportunity to access their talent, their skill and their ability in the prime of their lives. additionally african-americans, those descendents of the slave trade, whom i fondly call long-time stakeholders of this nation, have been affected by the broken system as well. working class amer
of the hurdles that remain from taking this legislative tax out of the five-page document, a very detailed legislative -- >> [laughs] >> a bit of a truce bomb. taking this five page document into a very detailed legislative policy. there are going to be a number of -- this bill could be several hundred pages long, and we are talking about a very sweeping change, not just to the immigration system, but how we deal with them. how they actually do that and the hurdles, it will be interesting to see. >> you pointed out that this is one of the biggest debates. >> remember what happened then. this blew up in the senate after a big push by the bush administration and the bipartisan coalition trying to get this through. it suffered opposition from both sides, particularly the right, creating an amnesty, but we have seen some of those voices muted, at least in the initial days, and we will see. >> this gang of eight, four republicans, four democrats, who put together this framework, this immigration bill, how did we find out that the gang exists? >> talking to senators. one of our reporters was the
are a tax advisory firm. financial advisory services. in our business, since our product -- we are a product company, our business is people with knowledge, ideas, innovation, helping clients solve their most challenging management and technology problems from a round the world. we have people who have deep expertise that we need to deploy in a quick manner. timing and speed is everything. within our brought workforce, our large u.s. work force, we complement our u.s. work force with farm workers, and mobility is important. we hire people from college campuses on these is. we use immigrant visas as well and green cards. also people wanting to become citizens. we also use -- we look at people who have expertise in specialized knowledge that we need to bring into the united states. we leverage other non-immigrants as well, but it is a matter of leverage in those to insure our clients receive the most timely , modern, and technology and process, so they can innovate as best they can. we know the statistics about 20% of companies in the u.s. had emigrant founders. 40% of the fortune 500 were fou
and a simplification of the tax code. this was part a the discussion on manufacturing hosted by "the atlantic." it is just under one hour. [applause] >> thanks so much for joining us. i want to start big picture. it has been a rough couple of years for the economy. people keep referring to the tantalizing signs of venue factory revival. manufacturing jobs are up to about 400,000. they are down roughly 6 million in the prior 11 years. is what we are seeing a dead cat bounce? is something going on here? is there a manufacturing renaissance in america? what are you seeing? >> is the us's manufacturing more competitive than it has been in the past? yes. it are a number of drivers. in high-tech manufacturing, material innovation is happening. there is a lots of innovation and advanced manufacturing. materials are higher than it was in the past ursus labor. the energy construct is being created by shale gas. the ability of companies to sell around the world and export in the markets that are growing. in the case of manufacturing, the future has a chance to be different from the past. we are at our
authority or tax expenditure or revenues nor does the bill contain any earmarks. i'm pleased to support this legislation. it is my hope that the national pediatric research network i will -- improve therapies and better outcomes for our nation's children and i urge my colleagues to vote in favor of h.r. 225 and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone. mr. pallone: i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, i rise in strong support of h.r. 225, the national pediatric research network act and commend my colleagues for their bipartisan efforts to move this legislation forward. there are many rare pediatric diseases and the children are incredibly fragile. if we can allow research to occur across the country, not just one single location, research can be done at a larger level because children could participate without having to travel. this bill would allow the national institutes of health to establish a national pediatric research network comprised up to 20 consortia,
leadership well into the future. it means that we're going to talk about, yes, deficits and taxes and sequesters and potential government shutdowns, debt ceiling, we'll talk about that stuff. but we'll talk about it from the perspective on how we're making sure someone works hard in this country. a cop, teacher, a construction worker, or a reception worker, they can make it if they work hard. their kids can make it and dream bigger dreams than they have achieved. obviously, a lot of what we'll be working on over the next few weeks is going to be on how do we deal with this sequester issue. i want to make this quick point. i had a press conference this week in which i reiterated that i'm prepared, eager, and anxious that ends this government by crisis that every two week or every two months or every six months we are threatening this hard recovery, are finally housing is picking up and real estate is doing better and unemployment numbers are still too high. we're seeing job growth and manufacturing is doing well and we continue to have these self- inflicted crisis here in washingto
. congress coming down one way or another could have a huge effect. tax policies could encourage or discourage innovation. our immigration policy where someone gets a phd and they -- and we can keep them -- and we kicked him out of the country for them to appeal against us, it does not make any sense. congress can do a lot. you do not have to be efficient on your iphone or your black very to understand -- blackberry to understand. >> what is your area of expertise? technology.and even if you have the right policy, making it work is very tough. the implementation of that is very difficult. we take a look at what the policy is in how to integrate it and make it work. we have an acquisition firm. we bring that source to government. when you try to get efficiency and try to publish the same goal with less people and fewer dollars, those are the kinds of things that we excel at. why would i do that? then i would have fewer people and the budget will go down. or i know a company that has the software that is much faster, but you do not need the people to do it. you can test it quicker
a background check, paying taxes, paying a penalty, learning english, and then going to the back of the line, beyond all the folks who are tried to come here legally. that is only fair. that means it will not be a quick process, but it will be a fair process and will lift these individuals out of the shadows and give them a chance to earn their way to a green card and eventually to citizenship. [applause] and the third principle is we have to bring our legal immigration system into the 21st century. it no longer reflects the values of our time. for example, if you are a citizen, you should not have to wait years before your family is able to join you in america. [applause] he should not have to wait years -- you should not have to wait years. if you are a foreign student who was to pursue a career in science or technology, or a foreign entrepreneur that wants to start a business with the backing of american investors, we should help you do that here. because if you succeed, you will create american businesses and american jobs. you will help us grow our economy, strengthen our middle- class.
of this need rely on limitations on consumer choice or tax hikes. we can take a long look at existing policies, reform them -- they need to be reformed -- and wind up in a far better place within a relatively short period of time. there is a lot we can do. but the question is, whether or not we will actually do it. are we going to push ourselves to do this? are we going to believe that we really can? abundant energy is absolutely possible. there have already been signs of it becoming a reality. technological breakthroughs have lower the cost of producing previously economic supplies. new technologies are making these clean energy sources -- again, the sources that have less environmental impact then there must likely alternatives. they are increasingly competitive, enabling energy efficiency to continue to improve, which is all good. throughout the economy, diversification of energy and natural resource supply is clearly apparent. and we can expect this trend to continue as electricity and natural gas among other alternative fuels as the continue to take hold. and the need to have more secure
campaigned on the suicide mission to reform medicare end to do tax reform. every town hall, every rotary, chamber meeting. i would talk about those things and those two things only. guaranteed political suicide. we can do this. >> in answer to that question, what will we do to get washington to do with the fiscal challenge? there were some business leaders and alan greenspan was there. he said what are you going to do something on this fiscal challenge? are you going to do it before or after the bond market crashes and it will crash. he is not known for hyperbole. and it struck me that the former chair of the federal reserve is saying you are facing an impending crisis and you will need to deal with that. the question is will you deal with it before it hits or after? the answer to that is it is part of the reason why i'm involved with this group. i want to deal with the problem before it comes a crisis and we need to make sure we build relationships and the trust necessary to find the solutions now. it will be too late when there is a crash. i'm afraid these problems will become too big
my constituents in taxes that congress is looking at passing a raft of new laws when the laws we currently have on the books are so woefully and enforce. -- not enforced. i think we need to do what we can to address the shortcomings in mental health care, as well as background checks mechanisms we used to screen out prohibited gun buyers. we need to ask what the years of the institutionalization of the mentally ill have done for the safety of the american public. we need to ask about people who are subjected to a court order to outpatient mental health treatment. tens of millions are falling to the cracks and surely, we can agree that more needs to be done to and from -- enforce existing gun laws prevent gun prosecutions are down across the board. -- existing gun laws. the gun prosecutions are down across the board. mr. chairman, i hope we will have a follow-up hearing to ask administration witnesses to come before the panel and testify why agencies of government are not enforcing laws that congress has already passed. it is worth noting that five years ago, congress was asking t
their fair share of taxes. the third thing we focused on was ending cuts to vital services mike medicaid and social security. and we wanted to create a fair path to citizenship for all immigrants. so we went into focusing on that as our effort this year. to do this our members said we had to be more efficient, more effective and more focused than we've ever been before. because on top of everything else we were facing this terrible imbalance created by citizens united. we said we were going to do asset of things. we were going to protect and expand access to the vote for communities of color and working families. we said we were going to particularly focus in the latino community which we watched in 2010 as a candidate for governor in california said one thing in english and a totally other thing in spanish and felt like she could walk away with a confused electorate and not pay the price for what she said in english. we were not going to allow that divide to create a confusion in the latino community. beyond that we said that we were going to shape the debate by investing your resources
with eliminating excess ending in our tax code, though that the wealthiest individuals and biggest corporations cannot take advantage of loopholes and deductionsnew york not billable to most americans. 2013 can be a year of solid growth, more jobs, and higher wages. that will only happen if we put a stop to self-inflicted wounds in washington. everyone in washington needs to focus, not on politics, but on what is right for the country. what is right for you and your families. that is how we will get our economy growing faster, strengthen our middle class, and how we will build a country that rewards the effort and determination of every single american. thanks. have a great weekend. >> hello, my name is susan brooks. it is a pleasure to speak to you from hamilton county in my home state of indiana. i have lived in indiana just about all my life. i have been david and i have raised two children here. i have been a u.s. attorney for this area, and starting last month one of the hoosier state voices in the us house of representatives. i am proud to live in a state that spends less than it takes in
be clear a kid walks into a store and the tax -- it is detected that this is a kid and changes on ghana and our marketing because there is a child under the age of 13 there. this is a case challenging -- this is a challenging proposition on many levels. i think it has become a real issue. where are the real harm is here. the real harm has to be marketed. we need to find out what is really improper use of this data and with the real risk is so we do not put our attention on places where the real harm is not. we need a lot more work to a identify the substance of firms. >> your original question. i do not think the ftc act is sufficient. i would like to see baseline consumer privacy legislation. this is not just about the harms that facial recognition can cause. harm at the ftc -- nor is it was a the spiders are coming in under your door. i tried to sketch out the capability of the technology went into the train when we can identify people and pick up on their emotional states and the health information consumers will want to have a choice on whether they participate in this. it wants to
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